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Teaching Philosophy

As a teacher educator and researcher, exploration and invention are central to my vision for teaching and learning. At Boston College, I teach a range of courses across online, hybrid, and face-to-face contexts. As an instructor, I consider my purpose (whether teaching courses in instructional methods for practice or teaching with technology) to facilitate experience, to make my students the primary course texts, and to learn through making, breaking, and replacing. For more on my teaching, preview course syllabi below.

 

 

Courses Taught:

EDUC 9864: Advanced Qualitative Research                                                    

Lynch School of Education & Human Development, Boston College

  • In-depth examination of foundational and advanced concepts in qualitative research and analysis. Provides an initial exploration in post-qualitative methods and methodologies to survey the theoretical, methodological, and analytic implications of conducting qualitative research from contrasting theoretical perspectives.

EDUC 9737: Digital Literacies                                                   

Lynch School of Education & Human Development, Boston College

  • Located at the axis of technology and cultural studies, this graduate seminar explores how contemporary literacy and learning are changing with the advent of new digital networks and communicative resources. With a particular focus on power and culture, this course highlights how digital literacies are situated in spaces of teaching and learning and how these socio-cultural understandings may illuminate issues of access, surveillance, identity and privilege.

EDUC 7101: Readings & Research                                             

Lynch School of Education & Human Development, Boston College

  • Special topics course where under the direction of a faculty member, a student develops and completes significant study on a topical area or interest. Topics taught include: critical ethnography, affect, emotion, and experience, and digital literacies.

EDUC 2105: Teaching the Social Sciences and the Arts                                           

Lynch School of Education & Human Development, Boston College

  • Offers prospective teachers the theoretical and practical knowledge into teaching elementary social studies, with a specific focus on arts integration. Through concurrent field experiences, and with a focus on gaining understanding of the major disciplinary perspectives of elementary social sciences (i.e., economics, geography, civics, and history), students explore the social, political, and cultural contexts of arts-integrated social science education.

EDUC 2104: Teaching Reading                                             

Lynch School of Education & Human Development, Boston College

  • Offers prospective teachers the theoretical and practical knowledge into teaching literacy, with a specific focus on reading, to elementary age learners. Through concurrent field experiences, and with a focus on gaining understanding of the major theoretical perspectives on literacy development, students explore the social, political, and cultural context of reading instruction.

EDUC 2101: Teaching Language Arts                                             

Lynch School of Education & Human Development, Boston College

  • Offers prospective teachers the theoretical and practical knowledge into teaching English language arts, with a specific focus on writing across genres. Through concurrent field experiences, and with a focus on gaining understanding of the major theoretical perspectives on writing development, students explore the social, political, and cultural context of elementary English language arts instruction.

RLL 8500: Literacy in a Socio-Political Context                                                      

College of Education, Wayne State University

  • Using sociocultural theory and cultural studies as points of departure, this doctoral seminar investigate language, literacy, and power at the intersections of the social, political, and the cultural. Course topics include: research on language, literacy, and learning in context; literacy, identity, politics, and power in education; curriculum and the negotiated nature of literacy teaching and learning; literacy development as (inter)cultural communication.

EED 6310: Young Adult Literature                                                      

College of Education, Wayne State University

  • Intensive examination of literary texts and materials appropriate for youth and young adults in secondary English language arts classrooms. Using theories of literacy and literary response, this class explores methods for teaching and factors affecting adolescent experiences with media and young adult literature.

TE 850: Critically Reading Children’s and Young Adult Literature                                                    

College of Education, Michigan State University

  • Intensive study and critical examination of the intellectual concepts and methods that have shaped contemporary understandings of children’s and young adult literature and material culture. Using theories of literary criticism this class explores how critical theory sheds light on literary paradoxes such as Anti/Signification, Text/uality, and Re/Presentation).

 

TE 831: Teaching School Subject Matter with Technology                                                                

College of Education, Michigan State University

  • Conceptual and application-based study of the integration of K-12 school subject matter with technology. Course surveys critical perspectives on digital technologies in schools while offering tools for the inclusion of technology across disciplinary domains.

 

TE 802: Reflection and Inquiry into Teaching Practice I [English Language Arts]                      

College of Education, Michigan State University

  • Qualitative and quantitative research methods on teaching and learning. Criteria for judging the validity and applicability of research-based knowledge in the teaching of English Language Arts. Framing educational problems worthy of inquiry. Designing and assessing studies of teaching practice in ELA.

 

TE 448: Issues of Diversity in Children’s and Young Adult Literature                            

College of Education, Michigan State University

  • Theoretical perspectives, controversies, and classroom implications for literature by and about people who have traditionally been underrepresented in children’s and adolescent literature. This course includes literature by and about African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos and Latinas, American Indians, Middle Eastern Americans, and groups traditionally marginalized by class, religion, ability, gender, and sexuality.

 

TE 448A: Special Topics - Issues of Gender(s) and Sexuality/ies in Young Adult Literature             

College of Education, Michigan State University

  • Theoretical perspectives, controversies, and classroom implications surveying literature by and about people whose gender identity and sexuality have traditionally been underrepresented in children’s and adolescent literature. This special topics course, while focused on literature by and about groups traditionally marginalized by their gender identity and/or sexual orientation, intersects with other minoritarian identities included but not limited to race, ethnicity, class, religious affiliation, ableism, etc.

 

TE 405: Teaching of Language and Literacy to Diverse Learners – Elementary (K-8)              

College of Education, Michigan State University

  • Teaching language and literacy to diverse learners at the elementary level (K-8). Inquiry into and construction of subject-specific meaning. Literacy subject matter adapted to learner diversity. Teachers’ roles, including professional, intellectual, and sociopolitical responsibilities.

 

TE 404: Teaching of Social Studies to Diverse Learners – Elementary (K-8)                                 

College of Education, Michigan State University

  • Teaching social studies to diverse learners at the elementary level (K-8). Inquiry into and construction of subject-specific meaning. Social studies subject matter adapted to learner diversity. Teachers’ roles, including professional, intellectual, and sociopolitical responsibilities.